Important Update...

Visit: Your Spirit Rocks! on Facebook . Our vendors booth at the local farmer's market is currently closed until further notice. We hope to be back soon ! Contact me about commission work. I'm the only Chris Sullivan in Calistoga, CA




Friday, February 7, 2020

This Week's Rock of the Week

Okay, so as you can see, I haven't posted for a while. I've been busy with friends, paying bills, going to the doctor, etc. etc. and of course... painting new rocks! This week is a commissioned piece that I did for a friend who has a friend who has a dog. She sent me a picture via email as a .jpg which I can easily modify in my image editing program Affinity™. Then I have to find a rock which is flat enough and large enough to accommodate the image. The image editing software can adjust the resolution, physical size, and integrity of the picture.

Now, it's time for the output. The Epson printer I use is an inkjet that produces lovely pictures on glossy/sticky-back photo paper. The image is then cut to size and fit onto the rock. After peeling the image from its backing, a stronger glue is added to adhere it to the flat side of the painted black rock. Some would call this decoupage.

Now the rock is ready for a clear coat of Triple Thick™ a high gloss finish which is quite viscous upon application. It is better to use one's finger to move the coat around one side of the rock, rather than using a brush. The streaks left will slowly even out, much like water finding its own level. Leaning the rock upright against a board is the best drying method. Ten minutes later, I do the same process on the opposite side of the rock.

Now the rock is ready for the glow/glitter adornment surrounding the picture. I add dots of Tulip™ brand glow paint, and like the E600™ glue used, are a skill that will get better over time. These liquid mediums are quite viscous, and one has to be careful about the blobs, nozzle blockage, smears and misalignment that can occur. This is the most difficult part of rock decorating. Keeping the nozzle of the squeeze bottle clear with a paper clip is essential. Having lots of Q-tips around is another necessary tool. Gingerly squeezing out just the right amount of paint/glue/glitter can be challenging. A whole assortment of accidents can occur which will certainly test one's patience. Lastly, making sure that the dots are the right size and evenly spaced is another practice to refine.

Lastly, I will use an Exacto™ knife to pull the dots out to a point. This method is better than trying to do the same thing with a thin brush. Just because.


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