Thursday, March 22, 2012

Like Night and Day

I have discovered a preference for rocks that have a surface which allows a brush to pass over them with ease. The paint can have a sensuous, thick feel to it.Most acrylic is viscous and smooth when applied. Adding water to thin the layer is an almost natural way to achieve a transparency . This appears as colors blend and show through, as one layer dries. Applying the clear gloss coat punches up the surface to a high sheen. The rocks are stunning in the light. Flourishes like stars and glitter have to be used sparingly, or else the final result can look garish.

When the luminous paint is added, it is like working in another dimension. Negative space becomes important, as the contrast between light and dark becomes more apparent. Paintings displayed under a constant light can generate a specific response that is not always contingent upon subject matter. A trained eye takes into account the many variables of light, color, hue, subject matter, and brush stroke. The importance of a proper backdrop cannot be underestimated, either.

Many will see these rocks as decorative and pretty, but that is only one’s first blush. When the rocks are scanned and modified in Photoshop, they take on a presence and power all their own. They can look like a Native American motif, or perhaps a Buddhist mandala depending on the way the rock is painted. I find that my own ability has been on the increase since I began this quest over a year and a half ago.

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